skip to content

Postgraduate Admissions

Teaching

The MPhil in Public Policy (MPP) is a practice-oriented programme that runs for nine months from October to June.

The course aims to strengthen the interconnections between science, research and innovation in public policy. Integral to these aims, the MPP will promote better awareness within policy circles of scientific developments and emerging technologies, which in turn will encourage long-term thinking and better strategic planning.

The MPP programme will qualify its graduates to:

  • cope with different forms of information, qualitative and quantitative with varying degrees of precision, relevance and uncertainty;
  • consider issues from a range of disciplinary perspectives;
  • spot what is missing, and how to recognise when the picture is incomplete;
  • critically appraise information from different kinds of experts;
  • integrate different forms of thinking; and
  • consider the implications of complexity, risk and uncertainty in policy-making.

The course seeks to attract students who want to build careers in public policy whether in government at national and international levels, or in the third or private sectors. The MPP will provide students with a thorough intellectual grounding and practical experience in the processes of policymaking, as well as an understanding of the range of knowledge and skills they need to be effective in the world of policy.

Candidates for the MPhil in Public Policy take a range of modules and case studies across the course of the year.  In addition, they will complete an independent research paper and a report on their work placement.

One to one supervision

Circa three supervisions per term.

The University of Cambridge publishes an annual Code of Practice which sets out the University’s expectations regarding supervision.

Seminars & classes

Individual modules differ in how they are taught. Typically modules are taught by interactive seminar and practical exercises. There are additional workshops around specific skills e.g. statistics, media interviews.  Each core module involves between one and a half to two hours of teaching per week.

Small group teaching

Individual modules differ in how they are taught. Typically modules are taught by interactive seminar and practical exercises. There are additional workshops around specific skills e.g. statistics, media interviews.  Each core module involves between one and a half to two hours of teaching per week.

Placements

The course includes a 4-6 week work placement which takes place during the University's Easter vacation period.

Feedback

Feedback is given in a variety of ways. This can be either verbally in supervisions or in written form. Students can expect to receive an online feedback report at the end of each term and specific written feedback for individual assessed pieces of work normally within 4-6 weeks of submission.

Assessment

Thesis / Dissertation

There is no thesis element for this course.

Essays

Assessment is by coursework and includes essays for individual taught modules, a 7,500-word report based on the work placement and a 7,500-word independent research paper.

Written examination

There are no formal, time-restricted, written examinations.

Other

Computer-based tests may be used to assess statistical skills and knowledge.

Apply Now

Key Information


9 months full-time

Master of Philosophy

Department of Politics and International Studies

Course – related enquiries

Application – related enquiries

Course on Department Website

Dates and deadlines:

Michaelmas 2021

Applications open
Sept. 1, 2020
Application deadline
March 2, 2021
Course Starts
Oct. 1, 2021

Some courses can close early. See the Deadlines page for guidance on when to apply.

Graduate Funding Competition
Jan. 7, 2021
Gates Cambridge US round only
Oct. 14, 2020

These deadlines apply to applications for courses starting in Michaelmas 2021, Lent 2022 and Easter 2022.


Similar Courses