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Postgraduate Admissions

2 courses offered in the Department of Public Health and Primary Care

The MPhil in Population Health Sciences includes the academic disciplines of epidemiology, global health, health data science, infectious diseases, public health, and primary care research. In the first term, all students take five core modules in biostatistics, epidemiology, applied data analysis, public health and research skills. Students subsequently select at least six additional modules, either following a designated pathway in one of the named  specialisation themes (epidemiology, global health, health data science, infectious diseases, public health, and primary care research) or following a more personalised pathway.

The course is open to postgraduates who wish to pursue a research, practice or leadership career in population health sciences.

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The Department of Public Health & Primary Care encompasses a broad range of themes (e.g. from Genetic Epidemiology to Behaviour and Health, from Health Services Research to Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology etc) and methods (e.g. quantitative methods, qualitative research, systematic reviews, functional genomics etc). PhD projects are typically available at each of the Units within the Department. Interdisciplinary research is also encouraged, whether within the Department or with other local or international collaborators.

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5 courses also advertised in the Department of Public Health and Primary Care

From the Department of Clinical Biochemistry

Awaiting Approval

From the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

The MD degree is a doctorate awarded to clinicians who undertake an extended period of scientific research. It provides an opportunity for doctors to receive recognition of research achievement within an approved academic programme.

The MD programme, on a par academically with the PhD, spans a maximum of six years, allowing candidates to undertake their research alongside clinical or other responsibilities, at the end of which their thesis is examined by Viva. Any candidate working in a Cambridge University Health Partner institution will be assigned a University supervisor and will  become  a registered student of the University and a member of one of the Colleges.  Any candidate intending to work at an institution outside Cambridge must already hold a Cambridge degree and must apply to take the MD by Special Regulations.

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From the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

The Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine Doctoral Training Programme in Medical Research (SCM DTP-MR) includes institutes and units within the School of Clinical Medicine, as well as other University Partner Institutions.
The program is offering at least five fully funded PhD studentships commencing in October 2022. Applicants should identify a group leader whose area of research falls into one of the following themes:
  • Neurosciences and Mental Health
  • Infections and Immunity
  • Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Disease
  • Data Science for Health

Applicants will be expected to approach the group leader, and agree on a suitable research proposal for consideration.  

Students on the SCM DTP-MR will complete 2 rotations in the first two terms. These projects will be in different disciplinary areas related to your field of research, and will allow refinement of your PhD project in line with your emerging research interests as the programme progresses.   The SCM DTP-MR studentships must be based in a department, unit or Institute of the School of Clinical Medicine. Please refer here. 

You will need to successfully complete the first year to be able to progress into your second year of studies.

This is an annual competition, and the opening and closing dates will be advertised on FindaPhD.com and on the SCM DTP-MR website.  ​For further details on the application process, please refer here

In addition, five Industrial MRC CASE (iCASE) studentships will be available for doctoral study at Cambridge, to start in October 2022. These studentships allow postgraduate research students to receive high quality research training, with the additional benefit of working closely with an industrial partner. These collaborations will provide MRC iCASE students with unique technical and transferable skills, as well as an insight into how commercial science is conducted, and entrepreneurial opportunities.

The industry partner specifies a research project that will be of importance to them, and provides a placement at their premises for the student of at least 3 months, together with an additional non-academic supervisor. Projects for MRC iCASE studentships will be advertised in Oct 2021, and can be based in either the School of Clinical Medicine, or the School of Biological Science. For further details on the application process, please refer to the MRC DTP website.

Each studentship (MRC iCASE and SCM DTP-MR), is fully-funded for four years with a stipend of £18,000 p.a., and includes all course fees, plus a research training support grant.

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From the Department of Medicine

This innovative programme was established in 2002 as a collaboration between the University of Cambridge and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US. Its aim is to train outstanding students in biomedical research, taking advantage of the excellent research environments. Students work on collaborative projects organised by co-supervisors at both Cambridge and the NIH, spending two years at each institution. Students have access to all NIH facilities and are paid by the NIH. The PhD is awarded by the University of Cambridge.

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From the Institute of Continuing Education

The MSt in Population Health Sciences (PHS) is jointly run by the Department of Public Health and Primary Care, the MRC Epidemiology Unit and the MRC Biostatistics Unit, with contributions from colleagues across the University. The MSt PHS is a part-time postgraduate master's course that includes the academic disciplines of epidemiology, global health, health data science, infectious diseases, public health, and primary care research. 

The course is open to graduates and other qualified candidates (see entry requirements) who wish to pursue a research, practice or leadership career in population health sciences.

The course of study for the MSt in Population Health Sciences (PHS) consists of eleven taught modules and a dissertation. The MSt in PHS is a two-year part-time master's degree of the University of Cambridge. It can also be taken as an MPhil in Population Health Sciences which is a one-year full-time master's degree of the University of Cambridge.

Students study five core modules and subsequently select at least six additional modules, either following a designated pathway in one of the named specialisation themes (epidemiology, global health, health data science, infectious diseases, public health, and primary care research) or following a more personalised pathway. Students also complete a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words.

Applicants should note that due to pre-requisites and dependencies, and constraints of timetabling, the pathways followed by part-time students will be dependent on which of the specialisation themes they are following. An indication of how the modules can be spread over 2 years for each specialisation theme is provided in documentation on the website.

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Department Members


Professor John Danesh
Head of Department

  • 25 Academic Staff
  • 100 Postdoctoral Researchers
  • 79 Graduate Students

http://www.phpc.cam.ac.uk/